Masters in ICT (Operational Communication) 

1.Brief description of aims and content (not more than five lines)

 The module will provide the student with an understanding of the economic principles and tools specific to networks and network industries. Broadens the understanding of the implementation of ICT in rural and urban society, trade and industry, and the knowledge sector (education and research).

2. Learning Outcomes

        A. Knowledge and Understanding

 Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

 1. Demonstrate a systematic and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of economic principles that will help in the implementation of ICT projects (A4, A7, A9)

 2. Have a critical awareness of current problems and also have new insights at implementation of ICT projects in rural and urban levels. (A4, A7)

 B. Cognitive/Intellectual skills/Application of Knowledge

 Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

  1. Use a significant range of the principle skills, techniques, practices materials, including some at the forefront of developments ICT projects to meet rural and urban needs (B2,B3,B6,B8)
  2. Apply a range of economic standards and specialised techniques or equivalent techniques of in the design and implementation of ICT projects (B1,B3,B8)

 

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

 

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

  1.  Critically analyse ICT projects and also adapt projects to meet the needs of specific sector of the economy. (C1,C2, C5)
  2. 2.       Communicate with peers, more senior colleagues, specialists and engineers in the ICT industries. (C2, C5).

 

D. General transferable   skills

 

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems in the use of advanced economic theories to deal with specific networks taking into consideration externalities; competition and compatibility; interconnection; universal service; market structure and regulation (D1,D2,D3)

 

  1. Broadening the scope and understanding of the students in the implementation of ICT (D6,D7,D8)

 

  1.  Formulating projects in the rural and urban society, as well as in the trade,industry, education and research sector.(D1,D2,D3)

 

  1. Analyse, evaluate and synthesise issues which are at the forefront of knowledge of ICT application in all sector of the economy (D7,D8)

 Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving ICT problems in all sectors of the economy(D1,D2,D3)

 3. INDICATIVE CONTENT

 Different economic issues such as network externalities; competition and compatibility; interconnection; universal service; market structure and regulation.

  The theoretical and practical base in different kinds of ICT policies as well as various experiences from African countries particularly Rwanda are discussed.

  The module also offers reflections about and skill development about ICT implementation in Rwanda.

  The main questions characterizing the course are the following:

   What are the actual reasons for ICT implementation in Rwanda and for whom?

  •  How is it possible to implement ICT in Rwanda on the society's own terms and in a sustainable way?

 4. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY

 Instruction consists of lectures, literature seminars, and practical exercises individuallyor as teamwork (group project work). Discussions and presentations of the projects are carried out using the web and/or in physical seminars.

 5. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

 Assessment of the students’ performance is based on the performance in the projects and the quality of the participation on the web and in the seminar discussions and/or written exam. Assessment of the students’ performance is also based on active participation at seminars, as well as on reports of compulsory assignments performed individually or as teamwork. 

6. Assessment Criteria:
  • For the assignment, criteria will be drawn up appropriate to the topic, based on the UR-CST generic marking criteria.

1 Brief description of aims and content

 The course focuses on modelling and analysing communication networks, network protocols and applications, using mathematical tools. Special emphasis is put on the construction of tractable models of complex networking problems and attack performance problems with analytical methods or simulation.

The course is primarily focused on stationary random processes from a probability point of view, analysed both in the time- and the frequency domain.It addresses performance issues in current and future Internet architectures. Applications include multi-access communication schemes (CSMA) and reservation techniques (token and polling) for packet radio networks (WLANs); routing in data networks (shortest path routing, optimal routing and topology design); flow control (TCP); quality of service (QoS) in IP networks requirements for multimedia transmission and network support: scheduling, shaping, forward error correction.

2  Learning Outcomes

A. Knowledge and Understanding

 At the end of the programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of

1.The performance issues in current and future Internet architectures and packet radio networks. (A4)

2. The techniques needed to analyze algorithms and computer systems. (A2)

 

B. Cognitive/ Intellectual Skills/ Application of Knowledge

 At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1.  To construct tractable models of complex networking problems and attack performance problems with analytical methods or simulation. (B3)

2.  Describe how a problem involving random processes can be identified and solved. (B2)

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1. Discuss and apply computation methods for random processes in linear systems. (C5)

2. Know the most important applications of random processes, especially in electrical engineering, mechanics and economy. (C8)

D. General transferable skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1. Have the capacity to analyse and solve problems related to specific technologies and the success or failure of new trends. (D7)

2.Use the usual English vocabulary concerning random processes(D6)

3  Indicative Content

        i.            Probability &Combinatorics:

Provides the fundamental concepts of set-based probability and the probability axioms. Conditional probability and independence are stressed, as are the laws of total probability and Bayes’ rule. Introduces combinatorics (the art of counting) which is so important for the correct evaluation of probabilities.

        i.            Random variables and distribution functions:

Introduces the concepts of random variables and distribution functions including functions of a random variable and conditioned random variables. Joint and conditional distributions are treated with expectations and higher moments.

      ii.            Discrete and continuous distribution functions

Discrete distribution functions as well as their continuous counterparts, continuous distribution functions, are discussed in this unit. Particular attention is paid to phase-type distributions due to the important role they play in modeling scenarios and the chapter also includes a section on fitting phase-type distributions to given means and variances.

      iii.            Discrete- and Continuous-Time Markov Chains

Contains theoretical aspects of Markov chains, and their numerical solution. The basic concepts of discrete and continuous-time Markov chains and their underlying equations and properties are discussed. Special attention is paid to irreducible Markov chains and to the potential, fundamental, and reachability matrices in reducible Markov chains. It also contains sections on random walk problems and their applications, the property of reversibility in Markov chains, and renewal processes.

      iv.            Numerical solution of Markov Chains

It deals with numerical solutions, from Gaussian elimination and basic iterative-type methods for stationary solutions to ordinary differential equation solvers for transient solutions. Block methods and iterative aggregation-disaggregation methods for nearly completely decomposable Markov chains are considered.

      v.            Elementary queueing:

Introduction to the basic terminology and definitions is followed by an analysis of the simplest of all queueing models, the M/M/1 queue. This is then generalized to birth-death processes, which are queueing systems in which the underlying Markov chain matrix is tridiagonal. It deals with queues in which the arrival process need no longer be Poisson and the service time need not be exponentially distributed. Instead, interarrival times and service times can be represented by phase-type distributions and the underlying Markov chain is now block tridiagonal.

    vi.            The M/G/1 and G/M/1 Queues

Presents the M/G/1 and G/M/1 queues. The approach used is that of the embedded Markov chain. The Pollaczek-Khintchine mean value and transform equations are derived and a detailed discussion of residual time and busy period follows. A thorough discussion of nonpreemptive and preempt-resume scheduling policies as well as shortest- processing-time-first scheduling is presented. An analysis is also provided for the case in which only a limited number of customers can be accommodated in both the M/G/1 and G/M/1 queues.

4 Learning and Teaching Strategy

 A course handbook will be provided in advance and this will contain in depth information relating to the course content. This will give an opportunity to the students to prepare the course. The lecture materials will be posted on the web page that will also contain comprehensive web links for further relevant information. The module will be delivered through lectures, tutorial/practice sessions and group discussions. In addition to the taught element, students will be expected to undertake a range of self-directed learning activities.

By the end of the course students will be able to construct tractable models of complex networking problems and attack performance problems with analytical methods or simulation. These abilities are necessary for everyone working on technical fields - to understand the capabilities of specific technologies and the success or failure of new trends.

5 Assessment Strategy

 100% based on individual assessment.

As this is a Theoretical and Practical module: The Final assessment shall include 50% of continuous and 50% of End of Module assessment.

The assessments shall be made 50% each for practical and theoretical aspects.

For Example:

one quiz (5%), one/two practical assignment (10%), one mini project for presentation (10%), one tutorial session (5%), short practical test (10%) and a short written test (10%) followed by final assessment (50%) of End of Module Examination divided equally into practical viva-voce and theoretical examination.

6 Assessment Criteria:

For the assignment, criteria will be drawn up appropriate to the topic, based on the learning outcomes.

1. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AIMS AND CONTENT

The course focuses on modelling and analysing of optical fiber networking, network protocols and applications. Special emphasis is to understand operating principals of optical communication systems with complex networking problems and attack performance problems with analytical methods or simulation.

The course is primarily focused on operating principals of optical communication systems. It address performance issues in current and future optic communication technology (characteristics of optical fiber, laser diodes and laser modulation, laser and fiber amplifiers, detection, demodulation, dispersion, compensation, ...). Application will include standards (SONET/SDH, FDDI), broadcast and select networks, optical wavelength routing networks, and Virtual topology design.

 

2.  Learning Outcomes

A. Knowledge and Understanding

At the end of the programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of

  1. The performance issues in current and future optical communication systems. 
  2. The techniques needed to analyze optical fiber networks systems. 

 

B. Cognitive/ Intellectual Skills/ Application of Knowledge

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1.  To construct tractable models of complex networking problems and attack performance problems with analytical methods or simulation. 

2.  Describe how a problem involving optical fiber communication can be identified and solved. 

 

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1. Discuss and apply computation methods for optical fiber communication systems. 

2. Know the most important applications of optical fiber networks, especially in telecommunication engineering. 

 

D. General transferable skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:

1. Have the capacity to analyse and solve problems related to specific technologies and the success or failure of new trends. 

2. Use the usual English vocabulary concerning optical fibre networking. 

 

3  INDICATIVE CONTENT

Introduction

Part I: Optical Communications Systems

  • Operating principals of Optical Communication systems
  • Fiber Optic Communication Technology
  • Characteristics of Optical Fibers, Laser diodes and Laser Modulation, Laser and fiber amplifiers, detection, demodulation, dispersion, compensation and network topologies
  • System topology, star network, bus networks, layered architectures.

Part II: Optical Network Architecture and Protocol

  • Introduction to optical network,
  • The ITU optical layer
  • First-generation optical networks
  • Standards i.e SONET/SDH, FDDI
  • 2nd generation optical networks
  • Broadcast and select networks
  • The light path concept
  • Wavelength routing networks
  • Virtual topology design
  • Photonic packet switching
  • Advanced solutions and future trends

 

4 Learning and Teaching Strategy

A course handbook will be provided in advance and this will contain in depth information relating to the course content. This will give an opportunity to the students to prepare the course. The lecture materials will be posted on the web page that will also contain comprehensive web links for further relevant information. The module will be delivered through lectures, tutorial/practice sessions and group discussions. In addition to the taught element, students will be expected to undertake a range of self-directed learning activities.

By the end of the course students will be able to construct tractable models of complex networking problems and attack performance problems with analytical methods or simulation. These abilities are necessary for everyone working on technical fields - to understand the capabilities of the Fiber Optic Networking technologies and the success or failure of new trends.

 

5 Assessment Strategy

100% based on individual assessment.

As this is a Theoretical and Practical module: The Final assessment shall include 50% of continuous and 50% of End of Module assessment.

The assessments shall be made 50% each for practical and theoretical aspects.

For Example:

one quiz (5%), one/two practical assignment (10%), one mini project for presentation (10%), one tutorial session (5%), short practical test (10%) and a short written test (10%) followed by final assessment (50%) of End of Module Examination divided equally into practical viva-voce and theoretical examination.

 

6 Assessment Criteria:

For the assignment, criteria will be drawn up appropriate to the topic, based on the learning outcomes.

 

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF AIMS AND CONTENT

This module aims at familiarising the learners with the methodologies and techniques of Academic research which will prepare them for the end of program dissertation work in the appropriate areas of communications management. This module examines some of the theories and methods associated with educational research methodologies through a consideration of definitions and purposes of research, approaches to framing the enquiry, methods, analysis and writing up the research project. Students are introduced to a range of research methods which are critically assessed. The module aims to give those working in education the confidence, critical understanding and skills to enable them to embark on their own educational research project. It also aims to provide a basis for informed judgements about research methods and evidence those members of research-led profession need to make.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

A.  Knowledge and Understanding

 

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

 

1.1.  Theories of operational communication and methodologies relevant to  Research and development.

1.2.  General and specific objectives of research related to operational communication 

1.3.   Research hypotheses and their importance with spectrum related issues.

1.4. Research methodologies (literature review, need of assessment, data collection, data analysis, validation, verification, and testing).

1.5. Budgeting and financing of research projects.

1.6. Methods of statistical analysis. 

1.7. Current trends and advancement in research on quality standards and otherrelevant benchmarks.

 

B. Cognitive/Intellectual skills/Application of Knowledge

 

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

 

2.1.Develop plans for research on operational communication. 

2.2.Develop new techniques and solutions to operational communication problems

2.3.Create new and innovative designs of management tools. 

2.4.Assess R&D work done by self and others.

2.5.Analyse different issues related to failure of operational communicationSystems. 

2.6.Assess and evaluated technical risks due to failure of hardware and software. 

2.7.Explore commercial and business risks due to system failure. 

2.8.Related research on environmental risks due to faulty system design and/orimplementation. 

 

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

 

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

 

3.1Design and Develop new projects in communications and its operations.  

3.2. Collect primary and secondary data, observe, analyse and report appropriately.

3.3. Analyse data using standard statistical packages or customised software. 

3.4. Design and develop new operational communication systems and related.

software independently.

3.5. Validate Software development / Management strategies based on the requirements specification. 

 

D. General transferable skills

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

4.1. Organize and conduct research in ICT management related research activities. 

4.2. Investigate and formulate reports on communications research projects. 

4.3. Coordinate with a team in research and also take lead when required. 

4.4. Save time and resources which add to cost directly or indirectly.

4.5. Communicate verbally with other individuals and groups, and prepare reports on

communications research projects. 

4.6. Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical utility as required. 

4.7. Use all kinds of hardware and software tools appropriate for ICT and research.

 

INDICATIVE CONTENT

  • Introduction to research methods, research concepts and methodologies
  • Reviewing the literature: bibliographic methods, sources, archives, information retrieval, keeping records and making notes, critical reading and structuring a literature review
  • Academic writing. Scholarly conventions and referencing. Plagiarism.
  • Planning the research process
  • Research design: types of design, selecting a design, establishing feasibility/access
  • Ethical questions in research. Research codes of practice
  • Developing the research proposal
  • Qualitative research: principles, methods and practice
  • Quantitative research: principles and approaches
  • Data analysis and presentation of information
  • Research supervision
  • Preparing the thesis.

 

LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY

The prime learning strategy is to make use of the self learning capability of the learners which will be supplanted with e-learning strategies, with a little bit of group work  and case studies on research methodology. Students will be encouraged to refer to the web and other relevant sources for learning materials. Further, the learners will also be familiarised to read and review current research publications in their area of study. Learning by problem solving also be another strategy.

The teaching is aimed at facilitating the learners to practice self study. Part of the teaching will be effected by the conventional lecture-tutorial techniques while the rest by modern techniques of instruction like field work, practice sessions, brain-storming and team-teaching (whenever possible).

ASSESSMENT STRATEGY

The assessment strategies are aimed at testing the achievement of the learners in different aspects of research methodology. As this is a practice oriented module requiring familiarity with reading and interpreting research literature, more weight will be given to testing the attainment of those skills required to understand and analyse research publications and disseminated knowledge. Assessment will also be made based on field work and regular practice sessions.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

For the assessment, criteria will be drawn up appropriate to the topic, based on the learning outcomes. For the practice part will be made based during the regular practice and problem solving sessions.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN

Component

Weighting (%)

Learning objectives covered

In-course assessment:

100

A1-A4, A7, A9,B2, B4-B7,C1, C4, C5, D2-D8

Assignment-1,2,3

30

PRACTISE /TUTORIAL

10

 

Quiz

20

 

 

 

 

Final assessment:

40

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGY FOR FEEDBACK AND STUDENT SUPPORT DURING MODULE

The Lecture / tutorial session are interactive with opportunity for students to do self-study Feedback is provided by the tutors after the assignment is submitted. Feedback for the module shall be taken on students feedback form. Lecture notes and presentation slides for modules will be provided by module leader. 

INDICATIVE RESOURCES

 Core Text 

1. Research Methodology by Reddy

Publisher: APH Publishing Corporation (1 Dec 2004)

Language English

ISBN-10: 8176486728

ISBN-13: 978-8176486729

2. Research Methodology by Khan

ISBN: 9780761935896

Publisher SAGE international

3. Research Methodology: Techniques & Trends by V. V. Khanzode

ISBN: 8170246482ISBN-13: 9788170246480, 978-2008

Publisher: APH Publishing Corporation

4. Research Methodology by Debashis Chakraborty

Published: Saurabh Publishing House

ISBN: 9788189005276

5. Research Methodology: A Step by Step Guide for Beginners by Ranjit Kumar

Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd (28 Jan 1999)

ISBN-10: 076196214X

ISBN-13: 978-0761962144

6. Research Methodology by Bhattacharyya D K

Publisher: Excel

ISBN:  8183234972

7. Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques by C. R. Kothari

Publisher: Wiley Eastern Limited (1985)

ASIN: B000KWR1TG

Background Texts  

1. Management Research Methodology: Integration of Principles, Methods and  Techniques by K. N. Krishnaswamy, AppaIyerSivakumar, M. Mathirajan

Prentice Hall, 2009

ISBN: 8177585630

ISBN-13: 9788177585636, 978-8177585636

2. Research Methodology by Thanulingam, N

Himalaya Publishing House

3. Research Methodology by Manoharan

Publisher: APH Publishing Corporation (January 1, 2009)

ISBN-10: 8131305295

ISBN-13: 978-8131305294

4. Research Methodology by Rohilla

Publisher: PHI

ISBN:  8120324528

EAN:   9788120324527

Journals

Key websites and on-line resources

Teaching/Technical Assistance

3 Lecturers     

Laboratory space and equipment

For group work sessions a room is required with a level floor with furniture that can be arranged for students to sit in groups.  A black or white board is also required. A computer lab with 30 terminals is required for assisting students in research and presentation of seminar.

Computer requirements

Others

PLEASE ADD ANYTHING ELSE YOU THINK IS IMPORTANT        

TEACHING TEAM

Dr. Alfred Uwitonze

Dr. Gaurav Bajpai

1  Brief description of aims and content (not more than five lines)

 

This advanced module introduces methods on how the supplier and constructor of software for telecommunications systems can deliver the right product to the customer, guarantee that the product is produced in the right way, and also create the right conditions to enable the work to be carried out in larger groups.

The module gives the student a basic insight into these development methods. This is a necessary background for understanding the work instructions/processes that different companies and organizations use. The starting point of the course is the student as a participant in a project or workgroup.

 

2  Learning Outcomes

 

A. Knowledge and Understanding

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

     A1-Statistical tools used to benchmark software for telecom system

    A2-basic concept of project management

    A3-design, develop and produce software for telecom system specific application

   A4-principle of UML, ER diagrams for design and development of software and awareness of software standards

   A5-professional ethical and legal responsibilities of software engineers

   A6-social impact of software development

   A7-buisness related techniques relevant to software engineering

 

B. Cognitive/Intellectual skills/Application of Knowledge

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

    B1-select statistical method for modelling software for telecom system

    B2-use principle of software engineering in the development of solutions to specific Telecom problems 

    B3-apply software engineering knowledge and computing standards to produce novel designs of software for telecom system and its components

    B4-critically assess design work done by other professionals

    B5- analyze failure in software systems and take preventive measures

    B6-apply technical knowledge on the impact of software failure to produce a technical risk assessment

     B7-apply practical knowledge to produce a commercial risk assessment 

     B8-apply software knowledge to assess the social impact of software for telecom system

 

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills 

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

       C1-plan manage conduct and report software for telecom system project

       C2-prepare technical report and deliver technical presentations on software development

       C6- plan installation and maintenance of software for telecom system

       C7-demonstrate practical applications of different types of software for telecom system

 

D.General transferable   skills

Having successfully completed the module, students should be able to:

        D1-create capacity for self-learning

        D3- carry out independently investigations on any software for telecom system project

        D4-work effectively in a team as member /leader of the software development group

        D5-efficiently manage time and human resources in the software development processfor telecom system

        D6-communicate effectively in software review meetings

        D8-use competently all available case tools

       

3  INDICATIVE CONTENT

 

Unit1: History and overview, Software processes:

Introduction –S/W Engineering Paradigm  – life cycle models (waterfall, incremental, spiral, WINWIN spiral, evolutionary, prototyping, object-oriented) - system engineering – computer-based system  – verification – validation – life cycle process – development process –system engineering hierarchy.  

 

Unit2: Software requirements and specifications for telecom system: Functional and non-functional - user – system –requirement engineering process – feasibility studies – requirements – elicitation – validation and management – software prototyping – prototyping in the software process – rapid prototyping techniques – user interface prototyping -S/W document. Analysis and modeling – data, functional and behavioral models – structured analysis and data dictionary.

 

Unit3: Software design for telecom system:  The design process and concepts – modular design – design heuristic – design model and document. Architectural design – software architecture – data design – architectural design – transform and transaction mapping – user interface design – user interface design principles. Real time systems - Real time software design – system design – real time executives – data acquisition system - monitoring and control system. SCM – Need for SCM – Version control – Introduction to SCM process – Software configuration items.

 

Unit4: Software testing and validation: Taxonomy of software testing – levels – test activities – types of s/w test – black box testing – testing boundary conditions – structural testing – test coverage criteria based on data flow mechanisms – regression testing – testing in the large. S/W testing strategies – strategic approach and issues - unit testing – integration testing – validation testing – system testing and debugging.

 

Unit5: Software evolution for telecom system: Software maintenance: the different forms of maintenance; the associated disciples and the role and the nature of configuration management and version control - Impact analysis; regression testing; associated software support - Characteristics of maintainable software - Software re-use in its different forms: their strengths and weaknesses - Reengineering - Legacy systems.Erlang Programming lab

 

4   LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY

A course handbook will be provided in advance and this will contain in depth information relating to the course content. This will give an opportunity to the students to prepare the course. The lecture materials will be posted on the web page that will also contain comprehensive web links for further relevant information. The module will be delivered through lectures, tutorial/practice sessions, and group discussions. In addition to the taught element, students will be expected to undertake a range of self-directed learning activities.

Students should be able to compare and contrast the differences between the major software in terms of their assumptions, requirement for a specific kind of data, and the different kinds of knowledge discovered by algorithms performing different kinds of tasks.

The students should also be able to identify which telecommunication algorithm is the most appropriate for a given project, taking into account both the nature of the data for the discovered knowledge

5  INDICATIVE RESOURCES

Core Texts

  1. Modeling Telecom Networks and Systems Architecture: Conceptual Tools and Formal Methodsby Thomas Muth.
  2. Development and Implementation of Wireless Telecommunication Systems for UMTS by Andreas Falkenberg
  3. Specifications of Digital Communication System Engineering With Software-Defind Radio Publisher , Artech House Publishers,  Publication Year 2013,  ISBN-10           1608075257,  ISBN-13, 9781608075256

 Background Texts (include number in library or URL) (inc ISBN) 

  1. Specifications of Software Engineering (English) 6th Edition (A Practitioner's Approach), Authored By   Roger S. Pressman Publisher McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited ISBN-10, 007070113X Publication Year 2012, ISBN-13 9780070701137
  1. Specifications of Software Engineering (9th Edition), Authored By   Ian Sommerville Publisher Pearson, ISBN-10, 8131762165 Edition 9th, Publication Year  2010
  1. Software Engineering, A Programming Approach, 2nd Edition, by Doug Bell, Ian Morrey, and John Pugh, Prentice Hall, 1992. 
  1. Software Engineering, Edited by Merlin Dorfman and Richard H. Thayer, IEEE Computer Society Press, 1997. 
  1. Specifications of Pankaj Jalote’s Software Engineering: A Precise Approach (English) (Paperback) Pankaj Jalote, Publisher   WILEY INDIA PVT. LTD.-NEW DELHI, ISBN-10 8126523115, Publication Year 2010 ISBN-13, 9788126523115 
  1. James F Peters and WitoldPedryez, “Software Engineering – An Engineering Approach”, John Wiley and Sons, New Delhi, 2000. 
  1. Specifications of Software Engineering Fundamentals (English) 01 Edition (Paperback),  Author BEHFOROOZ ALI, HUDSON FREDERICK J. Publisher  Oxford University Press, USA ISBN-10         0195105397 Edition 01  Publication Year  1996 April  ISBN-13         9780195105391

Websites:

      http://www.erlang.org/

1. AIMS


Mobile communications and the internet are now an essential part of everyday life. The aim of the module is to introduce the students to the design of wireless networks and in particular to illustrate the differences between fixed and mobile voice and data networks. The design of cellular networks will be motivated in terms of the properties of wireless signal transmission. GSM, GPRS, UMTS, HSPDA and LTE cellular networks will be used as examples of cellular network technology. Medium access control for packet oriented wireless networks will be discussed with examples from data-oriented network technologies such as WiFi (IEEE 802.11 family), WiMax (IEEE 802.16 family) and Bluetooth (IEEE 802.15). Quality of Service support for these policies will be presented.

2. LEARNING OUTCOMES

A. Knowledge and Understanding

At the end of the programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of
A1.The techniques required for cellular mobile communication system design and performance analysis;
A2. The currently operational digital mobile communication systems;
A3. The principles of mobility and handover, and compare the performance of various handover techniques;
A4. The protocols and architectures of various cellular and wireless networks including GSM, GPRS, UMTS, LTE, WiFi, WiMax, and Bluetooth;
A5. The new emerging systems for support of broadband mobile internet (4G and 5G);

B. Cognitive/ Intellectual Skills/ Application of Knowledge

At the end of the programme students should be able to:
B1. Explore real-life engineering scenarios to identify solutions both in cellular and in other mobile environments;
B2. Appreciate the design issues of TDMA and CDMA cellular systems;
B3. Calculate loss for radio signals using various loss models;
B4. Calculate and compare the performance of various signal modulation techniques,describe spread spectrum techniques, and calculate spreading codes using different methods;
B5. Derive a cellular coverage system using a basic loss model;

C. Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:
C1. Develop an ability to undertake research analysis, design, simulation and/or implementation given an appropriate level of supervision;
C2. Develop objectives and program of work;
C3. Collect information, assess it and present it in an orderly and coherent form;
C4. Work a document, which presents clearly findings, related to the study;
C5. Demonstrate practical applications mobile communications using simulations;

D. General transferable skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:
D1. Design a wireless access system as an integral part of a larger ICT implementation;
D2. Locate and access current research materials;

3. INDICATIVE CONTENT

Cellular Systems
Cellular Concept, Design of cellular systems based on a simple loss model. Concepts of channel Reuse, Signal Interference Ratio, System Capacity.

Traffic Engineering
Erlang's formula and its application to cellular systems, Trunking and Grade of Service.
Modulation, Equalization &Multiple Access Techniques:
Spread spectrum techniques, GMSK, OFDM, RAKE Receiver,FDMA, TDMA, CDMA, SDMA.

Cellular Networks
Basic properties of cellular networks, mobility and handover, Evolution of cellular networks from voice to data oriented traffic, Generations of cellular networks from 1G to 4G illustrated using GSM, GPRS, UMTS, HSPDA, HSUPA, LTE from the viewpoints of system architecture, the physical layer and system implementation.
Data-Oriented Wireless Networks
802.11 (WiFi), 802.15 (Bluetooth and Zigbee) and 802.16 (WiMAX) standards, Emphasis on MAC layer issues,QoS and Mobility support.

Simulation of Wireless Networks
Introduction to NS-2 and modelling of wireless networks.

4. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY

A course handbook will be provided in advance and this will contain in depth information relating to the course content. This will give an opportunity to the students to prepare the course. The lecture materials will be posted on the web page that will also contain comprehensive web links for further relevant information. The module will be delivered through lectures, tutorial/practice sessions and group discussions. In addition to the taught element, students will be expected to undertake a range of self-directed learning activities.

5. ASSESSMENT STRATEGY

As this is a theoretical and practical module: The Final assessment shall include 50% of continuous and 50% of End of Module assessment.
The assessments shall be made 50% each for practical and theoretical aspects.
For Example: one quiz (5%), one/two practical assignment (10%), one mini project for presentation (10%), one tutorial session (5%), short practical test (10%) and a short written test (10%) followed by final assessment (50%) of End of Module Examination divided equally into practical viva-voce and theoretical examination.

6. ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:

For the assignment, criteria will be drawn up appropriate to the topic, based on the learning outcomes.

7. STRATEGY FOR FEEDBACK AND STUDENT SUPPORT DURING MODULE

• Interactive lecturing style, with opportunities for questions, and requirement to work on simple problems.
• Peer marking of tutorial questions for formative feedback.
• Tutorial classes where students can ask questions and be lead through solutions as required.
• Marked summative assessments (laboratory report and assignment) handed back to students, with comments.
• Opportunities to consult lecturer and/or tutorial assistant in office hours.

8. INDICATIVE RESOURCES

Core Text

1. William Stallings: 2005, Wireless Communications, 2, Pearson/Prentice Hall,
2. Mobile Communications: Jochen Schiller, Addison-Wesley, 2000.
3. William Stallings: 2008, Data and Computer Communications, 8, Prentice Hall,

Background Text

1. T. Rappaport, Wireless Communications: Principles and Practice, Prentice Hall 

2. R. Blake, “Wireless Communication Technology”, Thomson Delmar, 2003.
3. W.C.Y.Lee, "Mobile Communications Engineering: Theory and applications, Second Edition, McGraw-Hill International, 1998.
4. D. N. C. Tse and P. Viswanath, Fundamentals of Wireless Communication, Cambridge, U.K., 2005.

Other resources

1. GPRS overview, http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/cellulartelecomms/gprs/gprs_tutorial.php, 110, 0, UMTS overview,
2. http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/cellulartelecomms/umts/umts_wcdma_tutorial.php, WCDMA,
3. http://privateline.com/, Bluetooth Tutorial,
4. http://www.palowireless.com/infotooth/tutorial.asp,The Nuts and Bolts of WiMAX,
5. http://www.embedded.com/columns/technicalinsights/201802589?cid=RSSfeed_embedded_news, 114, IEC, 0, OFDM for mobile and data communications,
6. http://www.iec.org/online/tutorials/ofdm/,

1. MODULE AIMS 

The course focuses on legal and regulations requirements of telecommunication systems at the international level through different international standards bodies(ISO, IEEE, ITU, 3GPP,...) and how this can be implemented at the national level.

The course is primarily focused on the wired and wireless communication regulations and their legal aspects with a focus on the telecommunication act and the path of local competition, wireless regulation, the market for video programming, the telecommunication industry transition, digital television; models of regulations and amendments and Regulations.


2. LEARNING OUTCOMES

A. Knowledge and Understanding

At the end of the programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of
1.The performance issues in current and future regulations of telecommunications systems including the standardisation process. 
2.The techniques needed to analyze legal and regulations aspects in telecommunications issues. 

B. Cognitive/ Intellectual Skills/ Application of Knowledge
At the end of the programme students should be able to:
1. To formulate national policies and procedures for the implementation of legal and regulations. 
2. Describe how a regulation at international levels can be implemented at the national level. 

C.Communication/ICT/Numeracy/Analytic Techniques/Practical Skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:
1. Discuss and apply legal and regulations at the international level in telecommunications systems. 
2. Know the most important applications of regulations in communication engineering. 

D. General transferable skills

At the end of the programme students should be able to:
1. Have the capacity to understand and analyse legal aspects specific to communication technologies and the success or failure of new trends. 
2. Use the usual English vocabulary concerning legal and regulations. 

3. INDICATIVE CONTENT

•  Introduction, Networks, and Bottlenecks
•  The Basics of Telecom Technology, The Traditional Model of Regulation, and the AT&T Break-up
•  The Telecom Act and The Path of Local Competition
•  Introduction to The Internet
•  The Future of the Internet
•  Voice over Internet Protocol
•  Wireless Regulation
•  Intercarrier Compensation and Universal Service
•  The Market For Video Programming
•  Industry Transitions, Digital Television, and Digital Copyright
•  Models of Regulation and IP As A Common Law Alternative
•  The First Amendment and Regulation of the Internet’s Content
•  International Standards

4. LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY

A course handbook will be provided in advance and this will contain in-depth information relating to the course content. This will give an opportunity to the students to prepare the course. The lecture materials will be posted on the web page that will also contain comprehensive web links for further relevant information. The module will be delivered through lectures, tutorial/practise sessions and group discussions. In addition to the taught element, students will be expected to undertake a range of self-directed learning activities.
By the end of the course, students will be able to understand and analyse legal aspects specific to communication technologies and the success or failure of new trends.

5. ASSESSMENT STRATEGY

The module is 100% based on individual assessment.
As this is a practical and theoretical module, the assessment shall include 60% of continuous assessment and 40% of end of module assessment.
For Example:
one quiz (5%), one/two practical assignment (10%), one mini project for presentation (10%), one tutorial session (5%), short practical test (10%) and a short written test (10%) followed by final assessment (50%) of End of Module Examination divided equally into practical viva-voce and theoretical examination.

6. ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:


For the assignment, criteria will be drawn up appropriate to the topic, based on the learning outcomes.

7. STRATEGY FOR FEEDBACK AND STUDENT SUPPORT DURING MODULE

• Interactive lecturing style, with opportunities for questions, and the requirement to work on simple problems.
• Peer marking of tutorial questions for formative feedback.
• Tutorial classes where students can ask questions and be lead through solutions as required.
• Marked summative assessments (laboratory report and assignment) handed back to students, with comments.
• Opportunities to consult lecturer and/or tutorial assistant in-office hours.


8. INDICATIVE RESOURCES

Core Text (include number in library or URL) (inc ISBN)

1. Telecommunications Law: Unscrambling the Signals, Unbundling the Law, CITI Symposium, Columbia Law Review, May 1997.

Background texts

Journals
Journal of Information Policy

9. TEACHING/TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

 

Lecturer /1 Assistant Lecturer

10. COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS 

Projector / SmartBoard with pointing device, VoIP equipment is required for ODEL delivery, Network& High-speed internet 

This module provides knowledge about the operation of modern computer and telecommunications networks. Advanced Network management and standards are presented to gain a practical knowledge of system and network administration as well as network supervision. It also presents theoretical and practical knowledge of known concepts of network security and security applications.

Module Code: OC61603

Module Name: Wireless Networks Designs

Description

The telecommunications industry has seen significant changes during the past three decades. There has been rapid growth in wireless communications, as seen by large expansion in mobile systems. Wireless communications have moved from first-generation (1G) systems primarily focused on voice communications to third-generation (3G) systems dealing with Internet connectivity and multi-media applications. The fourth-generation (4G) systems was designed to connect wireless personal area networks (WPANs), wireless local area networks (WLANs) and wireless wide-area networks (WWANs).

With the Internet and corporate intranets becoming essential parts of daily business activities, it has become increasingly advantageous to have wireless offices that can connect mobile users to their enterprises. The potential for technologies that deliver news and other business-related information directly to mobile devices poses not only new challenges but also opened up entirely new revenue streams for service providers. 

Prior to the emergence of 3G services, mobile data networks such as general packet radio service (GPRS) over time division multiple-access (TDMA) systems and high-speed packet data over IS-95 code-division multiple access (CDMA) systems were already very popular. At the same time, after the introduction of Bluetooth and imode technology in 1998, local broadband and ad hoc wireless networks have entered stage to attract a great deal of attention.

Aim

Provisioning data services over the wireless data networks including ad hoc networks requires smart data management protocols and new transaction models for data delivery and transaction processing, respectively. Over the past decade, wireless data networking has developed into its own discipline. There is no doubt that the evolution of wireless networks has had significant impact on our lifestyle. This module is designed to provide a unified foundation of principles for data-oriented wireless networking.

 

Indicative contents

The contents for this module consist of 10 topics divided into three parts. The first part covers fundamental concepts, the second part has its focus on the mobile networking aspects with several topics devoted to the discussion of WPAN, WLAN, WWAN, the third part takes on the other aspects of wireless communications such as mobility management and cellular network planning.